Hank Aaron, A Champion for Civil Rights


Hank Aaron fought racism the way he played: Quietly but with power


By Michael Lee Sports enterprise reporter

Jan. 22, 2021 at 7:20 p.m. EST


The mistake in trying to classify Hank Aaron as simply some triumphant figure who overcame racism to achieve baseball immortality is that it doesn’t do justice to what he experienced or how he responded. Racism isn’t something that can be conquered or ignored; it has to be endured. The pain is unceasing, the scars everlasting.

Aaron should have been able to leave this earth as he did Friday, at age 86, with fond memories of his career-defining moment: that 400-foot shot off Al Downing that pushed him ahead of Babe Ruth on the all-time home run list. The pursuit of 715 and that glorious trot around the bases as two strangers patted him on the back would have been more enjoyable if it hadn’t come with more hate mail than anyone should encounter. If he didn’t have to live in fear for his own safety and that of his family.

Hardened by death threats, a kidnapping plot of his daughter and unmentionable words thrown his direction during that historic chase, Aaron became a hero whose excellence couldn’t escape the ugliness of America’s intolerance. But through his smile, grace and dignity, he wouldn’t be broken or become bitter. He wouldn’t surrender a mission that began with a desire to use baseball as a means to leave a hardscrabble, poverty-stricken existence in Alabama and that ended with Aaron establishing a legacy that stretched far beyond the combined distance of those 755 long balls that sent him into retirement as the home run king.


“If you asked him, he told you the truth about racism,” said Sherrilyn Ifill, president of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, where Aaron’s wife, Billye, serves on the board. “He was not defined by it. He was a man at peace. If there were scars, it didn’t show. He didn’t walk into the room like, ‘I am Hank Aaron, and this is what I endured.’ That is also what made him special to me. We all want to believe and want to see people that contend with racism — as we all do — who overcome it, who played past it into their greatness but don’t lose their core. They don’t lose their center. He certainly never did.”


Aaron’s hero, Jackie Robinson, understood his purpose from the moment he broke the color barrier in 1947. The path was still uneven and wrought with resistance when Aaron made his debut with the Milwaukee Braves seven years later, but his role in advancing the civil rights struggle would play out over the next 22 years — from winning the MVP and a World Series title in 1957 to catching Babe Ruth to making the all-star team every season from 1955 to 1975 to becoming the first Black star in the Deep South.


“It still hurts a little bit inside because I think it has chipped away at a part of my life that I will never have again,” Aaron said in an interview with American History magazine in 2006. “I didn’t enjoy myself. It was hard for me to enjoy something that I think I worked very hard for. God had given me the ability to play baseball, and people in this country kind of chipped away at me. So it was tough. And all of those things happened simply because I was a Black person.”


Click to continue.

JOIN THE MOVEMENT!

SIGN UP FOR OUR MAILING LIST TO RECEIVE NEWS AND UPDATES.

VIEW PAST NEWSLETTERS HERE

ADDRESS:

807 ATLANTA STUDENT MOVEMENT BLVD.

ATLANTA, GA 30314

EMAIL:

CENTERFORRACIALHEALING@

EPISCOPALATLANTA.ORG

404-601-5335

PHONE:

© 2020 by The Absalom Jones Episcopal Center for Racial Healing

 Proudly created by SocialShifter.com